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Archive for June, 2010|Monthly archive page

Cisco Live 2010 – Day 4

In Uncategorized on June 30, 2010 at 16:24

Well, day 4 has begun for me here at Cisco Live 2010. My first class today is Keeping Your Sanity in a Virtual World with Nexus 1000v. This was an intermediate type class (2000 series) and was actually pretty good. It was not too technical (perfect for a first class after CCIE party) but just right if you want information and ammunition to move to the Nexus 1000v for a vm setup.

This press has some information that I will be sharing when I get back to the office and will try to push to the server guys. This solves the problems of who owns and controls the network in a vm setup. I am actually thinking about the appliance, Nexus 1010v, as that had a good overall solution for everyone. Not only that, but it also takes away the argument that the switch will take away server resources on the clusters.

See what happens, you never know. But regardless, i would love to pull out all the switches that we have for the vm network today.

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Cisco Live Day 2 and Day 3 recap

In Uncategorized on June 30, 2010 at 13:52

Well, the days continue to tick away here at Cisco Live 2010. 

Day 2 was rather uneventful to be honest, it is basically a day of classes and then the opening of World of Solutions (WoS).  World of solutions is where all the vendors get together and try to get you to listen to a sales pitch for perhaps some free trinkets.  At one time I would have listened just to get the free stuff, but I have learned over time that what you get is usually not worth the time.

The one nice thing about when WoS opens is that the Cisco store here opens as well.  The Cisco Store is nice as you have an opportunity to purchase Cisco Press books at a discount as well as trinkets that you can bring back to co-workers.  They also have shirts and other gear, so it all depends on what you are looking for.

Day 3 was the keynote from John Chambers, that is almost worth the price of admission itself.  John is a person that is very good in front of an audience, he knows how to get them engaged and walks around and does eye-to-eye communication with people.  He does not stay on stage and just speak, he engages.

During the keynote they always demo cutting edge technology, and this year was no different.  On Day 3 they announced the Cisco Cius – a tablet type computer for a connected world.  Here is a video to the ad and demo what was given at Live – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEk2MI4ZGlQ&feature=related

The Cius is an android based tablet, so it is based on open standards and code.  This device has some great potential for education, home-office workers, as well as anyone who is a road-warrior as it is WiFi/3G/4G capable.

Also on Day 3 is the CCIE/DE NetVet reception with John Chambers.  This is an invitation only event open to Cisco Live NetVets who hold a valid CCIE/CCDE certification.  (A NetVet is a person who has attended as least 3 of the past 5 Cisco Live conferences. ) During this reception there is wonderful finger food as well as drinks in abundance.  What makes this event wonderful is that it is an open forum between the NetVets and John where anything can be asked.  There where may good questions asked from Partner relations with regards to Advanced Services; hardware lead-time issues; futures of the Certification Track (future CCIE tracks a well as perhaps something more advanced); to even the future of John’s role with Cisco. 

To end out Day 3 for those who have CCIE/CCDE certifications was a part at Rio at the VooDoo lounge.  Cisco reserved the lounge from 8pm to 11pm for the private party.  Food was wonderful, alcohol flowed, and mingling was great.  It is a chance to meet some of the more prestigious certification holders as well as see friends from last year that you sometimes do not get a chance to run across.

Cisco Live 2010 – Day 1 – CCDE

In Uncategorized on June 29, 2010 at 03:57

Ok, so it is actually Day 2 of Live but I wanted to recap on the CCDE Techtorial that I took.  I will not give it all away, but want to cover the highlights for those who are studying or planning to test. I will disclose that i am interested in this cert and may pursue it next year, hence the reason that I chose to sit the class.

The CCDE class was called – TECCCDE-8005 – CCDE: The Cisco Certified Design Expert.  The presenters where Mosaddaq Turabi, Russ White, and Bill Parkhurst.

If you are not familiar with the CCDE, it is similar in certification level to the CCIE but focused on the design track.  It is the natural progression from CCDA -> CCDP -> CCDE whereas the CCIE is CCNA -> CCNP -> CCIE.  It is not above or below the IE, but viewed as an equal-level certification.  

The CCDE certification consists of a pre-qualification written just like CCIE. You do not need to have any other certification if you want to pursue CCDE – and that is just like the CCIE as well.  If you think that you can pass the pre-qual, go for it!

Since it was mentioned in the class, I will briefly cover what they said about the Cisco Certified Architect (CCAr).  If you wish to pursue that certification, you must have a CCDE in order to apply for the certification.  That certification is not a test per-se, but more of a real-world scenario that you need to address.  It is still infrastructure focused but is more focused on business requirements, long-term architecture, budgets, dealing with internal business conflicts, as well as your communication skills.  Out of all of that, the communication skills may be the most difficult to deal with.  They look at both verbal and written skills.  The fee for this certification is $15,000.00.  Here is a link to the CCAr on Cisco – http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/cisco_certified_architect/index.html

Now, back to the CCDE stuff.  I will skip info on the written as Cisco has the best info on that. http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/ccde/index.html One comment I will make is the study material for the pre-qual.  One of the recommended readings was the CCDE Quick Reference Guide from Cisco Press. http://www.ciscopress.com/bookstore/product.asp?isbn=1587058391  It is in PDF only via CiscoPress.

So, let’s get on with the practical information now.

When it comes to the practical they said that you should take what you know, keep that in mind, but read what the customer is saying.  If you know that there is no box that can filter MPLS traffic but the customer says they have a box that can, assume the customer is right.  Look at what they are trying to do and design to that.  You should not necessarily design to best-practice methods that you have already done, but try to design to what the customer is asking.

The SRND guides that Cisco produces are good to review and understand.  You should be able to read them, understand the technologies, and they figure out the how and why the solutions was done.  Things like that can help you on the practical.

You need to be able to “listen” to their request, figure out what they are asking, and then know what questions to ask based on the information that provided.  You will be presented with questions and answers that you might need to choose from.  Like what additional information would you need in order to work on a solution.  There may be some red-herrings thrown in to make you second guess yourself, so be confident on what you are doing.  Trust yourself.

There is also extraneous information that you are provided and need to know how to filter it out.  You are able to “highlight” on the test via software, so be sure to do that when you come across important information.  Also know that there is info to ignore, so don’t get too bogged down in the details.  You are not supposed to build the best network, but build the best network based on the requirements.

Understand underlying technologies.  Stuff like how does QoS work with tunnels?  If you create a tunnel, will Qos still work on the traffic?  What tunnel will allow you to do this?  Not the how to configure it, but what will do what.

There are two IGPs that you will see – OSPF and EIGRP.  You will see BGP and ISIS as well, but they will be add-ons to an existing network and not a primary underlying protocol. Know how to merge networks or split them apart.  What happens if a business spins off? 

There are 4 work models that you are testing on.  Merge/Divest — Add a service — Scaling — Replacing a technology.  Within those work models you will get either a design and deploy or a design and failure scenario.  When it comes to failures and such, fix the problem rooted in the design.  ID it and design a fix.

You will get at least two design scenarios and at least 1 failure scenario to work on.  The BGP and ISIS parts may appear on more than work model, but you will get them.  And be aware, BGP will probably be somewhat in-depth as well. Also be aware that IPV6 will/may be on there.  And more likely than not, it will be an additive to an existing network – think tunnels 🙂

Now there are some changes coming to the practical in the future.  The CCDE practical will be split into two platforms each consisting of two work models.  The first platform must be completed in the morning before lunch.  There is a timer so you will know how much time you have left, but this must be completed before lunch.  This is being done for two reasons 1) probably easier on the testing center with regards to lunch 2) Candidates can sit together for lunch and talk.  The current testing model you need to eat lunch alone as you do now know what candidate is where in the test.  This is a nice way to maintain the integrity of the test if yo ask me.

That split-platform is not implemented yet, but is something they are working on.

That covers most of the highlights of the session.  There was other things discussed but those are probably too risky to share outside of the session.  I just covered what most people already knew and they just confirmed.

Cisco Live 2010 – Day 1

In Uncategorized on June 28, 2010 at 14:46

Well, the first day of Cisco Live is now in the books for me.  There have been a few bumps and scrapes on the first day, but all-in-all I would call it a success.

What problems did we encounter on the first day?  Well, it seems as that some of the support staff was not sure of times and hours as well as where the registration line was.  Minor things there, and to be honest that is expected on the first day.  Most of them are locals who have not worked this conference before and need to get familiar with everything as well.

Another problem that we experienced was wireless.   The CiscoLive SSID was not working for the first hour or so of class.  Not sure what happened, but they did get it fixed quickly and we where back up and running.  What was impressive about the wireless was the speed, there was no problems there at all.  I ran a speed-test report and was pulling 13megs on my iPad.

The rest of the day was uneventful, which is a good thing.  My CCDE class was wonderful – Russ White was one of the presenters for the class.  If you do not know of Russ, you know of his work.  He is one of the people who have written CCIE labs for probably all tracks, the CCDE tests, as well as I am sure he is part of the CCA board.  Russ is an ubergeek without question.

The rest of the night, well lets just say if you see my tweets on Twitter, you know we had a good time.  And that is the other part about Cisco Live that some people seem to miss.  It is a chance and a time to meet new friends, have a good time, and enjoy renewing friendships from previous years.

Later on I will try to blog some excerpts from my classes, especially the 8-hour CCDE one that I took on Sunday.

Cisco Live CCDE class

In Uncategorized on June 27, 2010 at 17:06

Just wanted to post something up quickly on the CCDE class today. Up to know we have been hearing about the pre-qual test, and it has been good. Next up is discussion on the practical. I will try to post up something more comprehensive up when time allows.

Let the travel begin

In Uncategorized on June 26, 2010 at 15:56

Well, time for the travel fun to begin. In a few hours I will be landing in Vegas for cisco live. I will have to admit, this is looking to be one of the best ones ever!

Cisco Live 2010 (Networkers) Schedule

In Uncategorized on June 25, 2010 at 12:49

Here is my scheduled for Cisco Live 2010 this year.

PDF is available here

Jeffrey Fry
Jun 25, 2010
Cisco Live 2010

Sunday
8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
TECCCDE-8005………….CCDE: The Cisco Certified Design Expert

Monday
9:30 AM – 11:30 AM
BRKCRS-2041……………WAN Architectures and Design Principles
12:30 PM – 2:30 PM
BRKARC-3452…………..Cisco Nexus 5000/2000 Switch Architecture
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
BRKCRS-3045……………LISP – A Next Generation Networking Architecture

Tuesday
8:00 AM – 9:30 AM
BRKDCT-2049……………Overlay Transport Virtualization
10:00 AM – 11:30 AM
GENKEY-7846……………Keynote and Welcome Address
12:30 PM – 2:30 PM
BRKARC-2001……………Cisco ASR1000 Series Routers: System & Solution Architectures
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
BRKARC-3470 Cisco Nexus 7000 Switch Architecture
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Reception ……………John Chambers / NetVet Reception
8:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Party ……………Cisco CCIE Party

Wednesday
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
BRKVIR-2004……………Keeping Your Sanity in a Virtual World with Nexus 1000V
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM
GENKEY-7847……………Cisco Technology Keynote
12:30 PM – 2:30 PM
BRKDCT-2048 Deploying Virtual Port Channel in NXOS
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
GENSSN-7828……………The Borderless Enterprise: Driving Innovation from the Core
4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
BRKRST-2301……………Enterprise IPv6 Deployment
Rest of evening is Customer Appreciation Event

Thursday
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM
BRKARC-3471……………Cisco NXOS Software – Architecture
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM
GENKEY-7848……………Closing Keynote: Author Ben Mezrich
12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
BRKVIR-2931……………End-to-End Data Center Virtualization
2:30 PM – 4:30 PM
BRKCCIE-1001……………Cisco Data Center Certification – Breakout Session

iPhone 4 and FaceTime Packet Capture

In Uncategorized on June 25, 2010 at 03:07

Well, got our new iPhones today – yes, our.  I ordered one for myself and one for the Mrs.  The reason for ordering her one was two fold.  1) Her old cell phone is either dead in her purse or on the counter at home charging.  2) FaceTime.  With my travel schedule, it is just a cool app for me to see and talk to the family.

So, that all being said – I was curious to how FaceTime worked with regards to network connectivity.  So, my neighbor being nice enough to let me use his wireless (I did set it up), I added my wife’s phone to his AP and my phone to my AP.  I then created a capture filter on my Cisco ASA and made a call. So, here is what I found:

1.  The call is first initiated via regular Celluar networks.  In the contact list you will see an icon called FaceTime.
FaceTime Icon

2.  The phones then communicate to a server at Apple (17.155.5.251 is what I saw).  Communication is sourced from port 16402 via UDP initially and then looks to dynamically allocate ports for communication (16385 and 16386 are what appeared on my end).
Packets 1 – 10

3. The phone then negotiates an HTTPS connection to the servers at Apple for the setup and communication. There also seems to be some communication to other servers (in this case i see RCN 208.59.216.10) – and they are my cable provider.
Packets 11 – 101

4. After Client (iPhone) and server negotiation you start to see Stun requests via the private IPs, after they fail you see them from the Public IP NAT ranges. They success via the Public peering at that point.
Packets 102 – 123

5. A SIP call is then initiated between the phones for the video portion of the call
Packets 124 – 160

So in the end, this is a Video SIP call 😉

Text file of the capture headers:
Capture file can be found here

Below is the raw capture:
My iPhone IP Private – 192.168.0.128
My iPhone IP NAT – 216.164.100.100
Other iPhone IP Private 192.168.2.106
Other iPhone IP NAT – 72.81.200.200
Note: NATs change to protect the guilty

Here is the packet capture, but it is very difficult to read. I suggest downloading the text file – DOWNLOAD

No. Time Source Destination Protocol Info
1 0.000000 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 16402 Destination port: connected
2 0.431054 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: connected Destination port: 16402
3 0.715713 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: connected
4 0.716064 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16385
5 0.717147 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.252 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16386
6 0.958285 17.155.5.252 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16386 Destination port: 51136
7 0.960329 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16385 Destination port: 51136
8 0.960588 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: connected Destination port: 51136
9 1.016402 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
10 1.018172 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
11 1.019912 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [SYN] Seq=0 Win=65535 Len=0 MSS=1460 WS=2 TSV=469580285 TSER=0
12 1.020140 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
13 1.298294 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [SYN, ACK] Seq=0 Ack=1 Win=8190 Len=0 MSS=1360 WS=4
14 1.318312 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [ACK] Seq=1 Ack=1 Win=131920 Len=0
15 1.321211 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TLSv1 Client Hello
16 1.645657 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: connected
17 1.645978 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16385
18 1.646130 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.252 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16386
19 1.662234 192.168.0.128 208.59.216.10 TCP 50698 > http [SYN] Seq=0 Win=65535 Len=0 MSS=1460 WS=2 TSV=469580291 TSER=0
20 1.730834 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP [TCP segment of a reassembled PDU]
21 1.731963 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TLSv1 Server Hello, Certificate, Server Hello Done
22 1.808298 208.59.216.10 192.168.0.128 TCP http > 50698 [SYN, ACK] Seq=0 Ack=1 Win=5792 Len=0 MSS=1380 TSV=941715237 TSER=469580291 WS=1
23 1.832208 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [ACK] Seq=160 Ack=1361 Win=130560 Len=0
24 1.834588 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [ACK] Seq=160 Ack=2490 Win=130788 Len=0
25 1.834954 192.168.0.128 208.59.216.10 TCP 50698 > http [ACK] Seq=1 Ack=1 Win=131328 Len=0 TSV=469580293 TSER=941715237
26 1.836526 192.168.0.128 208.59.216.10 HTTP GET /WebObjects/VCInit.woa/wa/getBag?ix=1 HTTP/1.1
27 1.881018 17.155.5.252 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16386 Destination port: 51136
28 1.882147 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: connected Destination port: 51136
29 1.883124 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16385 Destination port: 51136
30 1.884207 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
31 1.886053 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
32 1.886343 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
33 1.930729 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TLSv1 Client Key Exchange
34 1.930835 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TLSv1 Change Cipher Spec
35 1.931583 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TLSv1 Encrypted Handshake Message
36 2.190008 208.59.216.10 192.168.0.128 TCP http > 50698 [ACK] Seq=1 Ack=229 Win=6432 Len=0 TSV=941715619 TSER=469580293
37 2.190313 208.59.216.10 192.168.0.128 TCP [TCP segment of a reassembled PDU]
38 2.191366 208.59.216.10 192.168.0.128 TCP [TCP segment of a reassembled PDU]
39 2.192312 208.59.216.10 192.168.0.128 HTTP/XML HTTP/1.1 200 OK
40 2.242678 192.168.0.128 208.59.216.10 TCP 50698 > http [ACK] Seq=229 Ack=2737 Win=128592 Len=0 TSV=469580297 TSER=941715619
41 2.243014 192.168.0.128 208.59.216.10 TCP 50698 > http [ACK] Seq=229 Ack=3506 Win=127820 Len=0 TSV=469580297 TSER=941715619
42 2.393275 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [ACK] Seq=2490 Ack=299 Win=35216 Len=0
43 2.393305 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [ACK] Seq=2490 Ack=305 Win=35216 Len=0
44 2.393351 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [ACK] Seq=2490 Ack=342 Win=35184 Len=0
45 2.394633 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TLSv1 Change Cipher Spec, Encrypted Handshake Message
46 2.448112 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [ACK] Seq=342 Ack=2533 Win=131876 Len=0
47 2.449760 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TLSv1 Application Data
48 2.450325 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TLSv1 Application Data
49 2.511448 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: connected
50 2.512608 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16385
51 2.512776 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.252 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16386
52 2.905644 17.155.5.252 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16386 Destination port: 51136
53 2.905690 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [ACK] Seq=2533 Ack=966 Win=34560 Len=0
54 2.905782 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [ACK] Seq=2533 Ack=1453 Win=34064 Len=0
55 2.906896 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16385 Destination port: 51136
56 2.907536 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: connected Destination port: 51136
57 2.923466 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TLSv1 Application Data
58 2.923924 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TLSv1 Application Data
59 3.060254 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
60 3.060422 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
61 3.062146 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [ACK] Seq=1453 Ack=2894 Win=131556 Len=0
62 3.062451 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [ACK] Seq=1453 Ack=3240 Win=131212 Len=0
63 3.062741 192.168.0.128 199.7.52.190 TCP 50699 > http [SYN] Seq=0 Win=65535 Len=0 MSS=1460 WS=2 TSV=469580305 TSER=0
64 3.063122 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
65 3.532458 199.7.52.190 192.168.0.128 TCP http > 50699 [SYN, ACK] Seq=0 Ack=1 Win=8190 Len=0 MSS=1380
66 3.571122 192.168.0.128 199.7.52.190 TCP 50699 > http [ACK] Seq=1 Ack=1 Win=65535 Len=0
67 3.579117 192.168.0.128 199.7.52.190 HTTP GET /EVIntl2006.cer HTTP/1.1
68 3.690690 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TLSv1 Encrypted Alert
69 3.692505 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: connected
70 3.696701 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [FIN, ACK] Seq=1476 Ack=3240 Win=131920 Len=0
71 3.697007 192.168.0.128 208.59.216.10 TCP 50698 > http [FIN, ACK] Seq=229 Ack=3506 Win=131328 Len=0 TSV=469580312 TSER=941715619
72 3.697388 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16385
73 3.697617 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.252 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16386
74 3.809626 199.7.52.190 192.168.0.128 TCP [TCP segment of a reassembled PDU]
75 3.810572 199.7.52.190 192.168.0.128 HTTP HTTP/1.0 200 OK (text/plain)
76 3.881720 192.168.0.128 199.7.52.190 TCP 50699 > http [ACK] Seq=154 Ack=1865 Win=65535 Len=0
77 3.890585 192.168.0.128 199.7.52.190 TCP 50699 > http [FIN, ACK] Seq=154 Ack=1865 Win=65535 Len=0
78 3.952258 208.59.216.10 192.168.0.128 TCP http > 50698 [FIN, ACK] Seq=3506 Ack=230 Win=6432 Len=0 TSV=941717381 TSER=469580312
79 3.954256 192.168.0.128 208.59.216.10 TCP 50698 > http [ACK] Seq=230 Ack=3507 Win=131328 Len=0 TSV=469580314 TSER=941717381
80 4.007781 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [ACK] Seq=3240 Ack=1476 Win=40928 Len=0
81 4.007965 17.155.4.14 192.168.0.128 TCP https > 50697 [FIN, ACK] Seq=3240 Ack=1477 Win=40928 Len=0
82 4.009155 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16385 Destination port: 51136
83 4.009170 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: connected Destination port: 51136
84 4.009948 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [FIN, ACK] Seq=1476 Ack=3240 Win=131920 Len=0
85 4.014495 192.168.0.128 17.155.4.14 TCP 50697 > https [ACK] Seq=1477 Ack=3241 Win=131920 Len=0
86 4.019866 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
87 4.023955 17.155.5.252 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16386 Destination port: 51136
88 4.025984 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
89 4.034971 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
90 4.504292 199.7.52.190 192.168.0.128 TCP http > 50699 [ACK] Seq=1865 Ack=155 Win=8190 Len=0
91 4.671800 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: connected
92 4.672167 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16385
93 4.672411 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.252 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16386
94 5.139092 17.155.5.252 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16386 Destination port: 51136
95 5.140068 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16385 Destination port: 51136
96 5.140129 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: connected Destination port: 51136
97 5.210011 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
98 5.215809 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
99 5.216068 192.168.0.128 216.164.100.100 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 52585
100 5.715774 192.168.0.128 17.155.5.251 UDP Source port: 51136 Destination port: 16385
101 6.054578 17.155.5.251 192.168.0.128 UDP Source port: 16385 Destination port: 51136
102 8.258196 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
103 8.286606 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
104 8.303893 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Request
105 8.313353 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
106 8.313582 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Request
107 8.316909 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Success Response
108 8.333677 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Request
109 8.344419 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Request
110 8.350980 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Success Response
111 8.360852 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Request
112 8.374294 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Request
113 8.376750 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Success Response
114 8.467002 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
115 8.496083 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
116 8.528156 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Request
117 8.530139 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Request
118 8.530765 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Success Response
119 8.553316 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Request
120 8.555467 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Request
121 8.556032 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 STUN2 Binding Success Response
122 8.626234 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Success Response
123 8.629896 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Success Response
124 8.730361 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP/SDP Request: INVITE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925, with session description
125 8.748746 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Success Response
126 8.771618 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
127 8.797557 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
128 8.925571 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Success Response
129 8.927723 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 STUN2 Binding Success Response
130 9.232700 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP/SDP Request: INVITE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925, with session description
131 9.258562 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
132 9.262926 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 100 Trying
133 9.268831 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 180 Ringing
134 9.296692 192.168.0.128 192.168.2.106 STUN2 Binding Request
135 9.320586 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP/SDP Status: 200 OK, with session description
136 9.326857 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: ACK sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
137 9.334699 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: MESSAGE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
138 9.688477 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP/SDP Status: 200 OK, with session description
139 9.716567 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: ACK sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
140 9.834542 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: MESSAGE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
141 10.216053 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 200 OK
142 10.230152 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: MESSAGE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
143 10.442848 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 200 OK
144 10.491689 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 200 OK
145 10.727812 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: MESSAGE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
146 11.229984 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: MESSAGE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
147 11.318007 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 200 OK
148 11.367565 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: MESSAGE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
149 11.618986 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 200 OK
150 11.866691 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Request: MESSAGE sip:user@72.81.200.200:50925
151 11.998932 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 UDP Source port: 16402 Destination port: 50925
152 12.035444 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 200 OK
153 12.063916 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 UDP Source port: 16402 Destination port: 50925
154 12.129174 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 UDP Source port: 16402 Destination port: 50925
155 12.180258 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 UDP Source port: 16402 Destination port: 50925
156 12.183416 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 UDP Source port: 16402 Destination port: 50925
157 12.187093 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Status: 200 OK
158 12.195043 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 UDP Source port: 16402 Destination port: 50925
159 12.200932 72.81.200.200 192.168.0.128 SIP Request: BYE sip:user@192.168.0.128:16402
160 12.206181 192.168.0.128 72.81.200.200 SIP Status: 200 OK

CCIE Rack vbs script for SecureCRT

In Uncategorized on June 23, 2010 at 12:27

Well I finally got around to writing a script in order log into all my lab routers.  Why?  I got tired of typing R1, then password, breaking out and going to the next.  When you connect to 8 routers for every lab, it takes time.

So, below is the script I use for my SecureCRT session.    Pretty simple, just did a record of the first two and then edited the rest of them in.

It can also be found here for easier reading:
http://pastebin.com/NUdBENdc

—————————————————————–

#$language = “VBScript”
#$interface = “1.0”

crt.Screen.Synchronous = True

Sub Main
 crt.Screen.Send “r1” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R1#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x2” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “r2” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R2#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x3” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “r3” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R3#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x4” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “r4” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R4#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x5” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “r5” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R5#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x6” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “r6” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R6#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x7” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “r7” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R7#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x8” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “r8” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Password: ”
 crt.Screen.Send “PassWord” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.Send chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “Rack1R8#”
 crt.Screen.Send chr(30) & “x9” & chr(13)
 crt.Screen.WaitForString “TS1#”
 
 crt.Screen.Send “1” & chr(13)

End Sub

Wordpress for iPad installed

In Uncategorized on June 23, 2010 at 02:53

Well, WordPress for iPad has been installed. Hopefully I can keep this up now. I am hoping that I can blog my way through live this year. With the iPad and wordpress, should be much easier now. The laptop is too cumbersome during the event, let’s hope the ipad is up to the task.

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