fryguypa

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Site has moved…

In Uncategorized on May 25, 2011 at 08:34

This site will be moving to http://www.fryguy.net and will be updated on that site going forward.

I have left this site accessible as there are links out there and I want to make sure that they still work.

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IPv6 – My IPv6 Tutor website

In Uncategorized on May 10, 2011 at 22:11

This is just a quick post on a new venture one of my good friends, Brandon, has embarked on.  Brandon is a well recognized and respected Cisco trainer in the industry and has published a few books for Cisco Press over the years.  His books include CCNA Wireless Official Exam Certification Guide and Cisco Access Control Security as well as a few others.

Recently he has decided to embark on another endeavor, and this one could not have better timing.  He is launching a website for IPv6 tutoring called MyIPv6Tutor.com

If you want to learn more about IPv6 and such, might be a good time to head over there and see what a Cisco Certified Systems Instructor has to say about IPv6!

Nexus 7009

In Uncategorized on March 30, 2011 at 21:12

Well, today we can welcome the Cisco Nexus 7009 to the Nexus family.  It joins its big brothers the 7010 and 7018 as you can see below.

So, what does this new chassis give us over its bigger brothers?  Well for one thing, SPACE!  The Nexus 7009 is only 14RU compared to the 7010 at 21RU and the 7018 at 25RU. What does that actually mean, well if you look at a standard 6509 / 6509E chassis – they are 15RU.  This new Nexus 7009 is actually 1RU smaller, nice!  One of the biggest complaints with the Nexus is that it is difficult to install if you are replacing an existing 6509 chassis with one, the 7010 is bigger and – as we all know – space in a data center is very precious!

More to come on this switch as information becomes public.

Drobo from Tech Field Day

In Uncategorized on February 21, 2011 at 22:06

Just a quick post on Drobo.

We visited them on Tech Field Day and heard about their offerings as well as touched their product. To be quite honest, I was very impressed with what I saw. I have been considering getting a Drobo for quite some time and finally pulled the trigger. The discount code BESTDEALEVER was too hard to pass up.

So, why am I telling you this? Simple, I will do a write-up that consists of my TFD5 experience with Drobo and my experience with an actual unit. Their product is top notch and deserves a justified write-up. Just writing based on my experience at TFD5 would not do their product justice. Being able to relate my experience at TFD as well as the setup and use of the unit is what it deserves.

Hoping that the order shows up quickly so I can get this post done (also want to play with the new toy 🙂 )

Tech Field Day Disclosure:
Drobo was a sponsor of Tech Field Day 5, and as such was responsible for a portion of my airfare and hotel accommodations. At no time did Drobo ask for nor were they promised any kind of consideration in this article. Any and all analysis and opinions are mine and mine alone.

Gestalt IT Tech Field Day #5 Exerience

In Uncategorized on February 13, 2011 at 23:30

Well it is now Sunday, two days after Tech Field Day #5 ended.  I am finally starting to digest everything that was presented to the team and just wanted to take a moment and share some of my experiences.  I am going to hold off on commenting on the data gathered from the presentation because I would like to gather some more information, review my notes, as well as even review some of the wonderful video that was shot.

Let me start off with the invitation to the event.  To be quite honest I was very surprised to be invited to this event because I did not think I was worthy of attendance.  When I was asked, I was very excited at first – then humbled by the invitation.  It is because of all of you that I was able to go – and that I thank you for. If you are interesting in being a delagate, some of the things that are sought after are respected by your peers, knowledgeable in the industry, and being respectful to others. To apply to be a delegate, please feel free to visit Gestalt IT at this link.

When it comes to the preparation for the event, it shows that they know what they are doing.  The travel arrangements are spot on, your hotel room is ready for you when you get there, the transportation schedule is worked out to the minute (and we all know that is an amazing thing to do!), and the dinner arrangements are perfect.  You can tell this is a profession organization and knows how to plan an event!  The preparation that they do is amazing, if not mind boggling.   They have a schedule that is well communicated, well planned, and very well thought out.  They also make sure that the presenters are aware without actually interrupting the event – they run a fine show.

Gathering on the first night.

Our first day (Wednesday) was very well planned.  They had a delegate there with a Gestalt IT Tech Field Day sign, waiting for people to arrive. This person had the privilege of welcoming you to the event and letting you know what is going on.  This little bit if personal touch makes it so much easier considering you may not know anyone there. This helps to bridge the initial gap in communication as well as build the bases for a sense of comradery with everyone else.  Once you are all checked in, you have some time to mingle and get to know everyone – by names and not twitter handles 🙂 – with the others prior to dinner.

Dinner with the delegates

 

Dinner the first night was awesome! It was a small Mediterranean restaurant called Zeytoun that is  a quick 5 minute walk from the hotel.  The evening was alot of fun as we were each asked to bring a gift from our hometown to share.  It was something that should be representative of where you are from, so I chose Mike and Ikes from Just Born Candy.  I think everyone liked them, at least most people seemed pleased with that gift – either that or it was just the sugar rush that came with a BIG box of them 🙂  As dinner progressed, we even had some cultural entertainment for the evening – a belly dancer.  Initial impression might be WHAT?!, but if you look at many Mediterranean style restaurants, the dancers are common as are hookahs (no hookahs as CA is non-smoking). The young lady dancing was mesmerizing and entertaining to watch . I have never seen this type of entertainment in person, and watching her dance with the sword on her head was simply amazing!

To finish off our fist day of classes, we all gathered at the Computer History Museum to mix and match with all the vendors for the event.  Some of them had already presented whilst others would be presenting the following day. This was a nice experience and a great way to wind down the first day of sessions.  We had a chance to see the Babbage Difference Engine No. 2 run that evening.  For those of you who do not know what this is, it is an automatic, mechanical calculator designed to work with polynomial equations.  It consists of 8,000 parts and was designed around 1822! Below is a video of the machine actually working, and yes it is hand-cranked!

It was a great pleasure and honor to actually meet Stephen Foskett at this event.  Yes, it is his event; Yes, he runs the event, but to finally meet the man who has brought us so much information to the community was a wonderful experience.  He has a great sense of humor as well as some amazing knowledge of the industry.  I was very surprised at his in depth knowledge of the industry and technology, and to be honest it was very refreshing.  He loves what he does and I think he loves bringing together smart people to enjoy the experience.  Below is a video from the first evening with Stephen introducing Tech Field Day #5

Now, Claire – what can I say about this lovely lady.  I think that she is truly the glue that makes everything happen and keeps everything moving.  She is more on top of things that we will ever know and I am confident that she was doing things and addressing issues that we never even knew existed.  She is a wonderful person, great sense of humor, and just an all around good egg.  She and Stephen are as much as a key to this event as are the delegates.

To recap, this is a great experience and one that should not be missed.  If you ever get an invitation to go, do not hesitate to accept or worry about how any of it works.  You can trust the people behind this event, they will take care of you.  Perhaps I will see you at a future Tech Field Days, that is if Stephen would ask me again (fingers crossed).

I just want to thank the past delegates who helped to make this happen; the delegates I attended with for helping me to learn more; the companies that helped to make this event happen; and to Stephen for the honor to attend.

Below are links to the other delegates from Tech Field Day #5, be sure to check the sites out as well.

Sean Clark SeanClark.us @vSeanClark
Jeff Fry FryGuy’s Blog @FryGuy_PA
Robin Harris StorageMojo @StorageMojo
Bill Hill Virtual Bill
Gestalt IT
@Virtual_Bill
Tom Hollingsworth The Networking Nerd @NetworkingNerd
Matthew Norwood Network Therapy @MatthewNorwood
Devang Panchigar StorageNerve @StorageNerve
W. Curtis Preston Backup Central @WCPreston
Maish Saidel-Keesing Technodrone @MaishSK
Eric Siebert vSphere-land @EricSiebert
Greg Stuart vDestination
Chris Wells vSamurai @wygtya

Gestalt IT’s Tech Field Day #5

In Uncategorized on February 8, 2011 at 14:09

Well, the week has finally come and the hours are ticking until Tech Field Day #5 in San Jose, CA begins. Tomorrow will be a fun filled travel day for me (ABE – ORD – SJC) and then then the real fun will begin that evening.

Cannot wait to see what the the vendors have to share and say and as well as what I am going to learn. This will be a great adventure for me!

Watch for some blogging during the event, I will do my best to keep things up to date.

Using a Cisco Device as a TFTP Server

In How To, Uncategorized on January 26, 2011 at 08:00

The other day I mentioned about using a router as a TFTP server to upgrade other devices.  Since I did mention that, it makes sense to post on how to use a router for this functionality.

Have you ever need to upgrade the IOS on a remote device?  Happened to have more then one of those at a remote site? Have multiple devices at a site to upgrade?  I am sure we have all been there at one time or another with one or all of these scenarios.  Most of us tend to pre-load the code on the devices in preparation for the upgrade, but what happens when you have insufficient space on the device you need to upgrade?  Typically that means performing the IOS transfer when you are doing the upgrade and not before – that is usually during sleeping hours and not business hours.

What happens if you could A) send a USB drive to the site and have someone plug it in or B) Copy the files necessary to another device and use that to copy the files from?  Both of these sound much better then having to upload code in the middle of the night.  Well, but configuring your router to act as a TFTP server, you might allow yourself some sleep time instead of watching the !!!!! – and the occasional 000 – go across the screen.

For this blog, lets use this topology:

Network Topology

R1 will be configured as the TFTP server and host files for SW1 and R2 and the network we will be using is 100.100.100.0/24.  For the blog, I will only demonstrate on R2, but since the Switch is IOS, the commands are the same.

Router/Switch Output
Commands
Notes

On R1, lets configure the G0/0 interface on this router (its a 3800 series)

FryGuyR1(config)#int g0/0
FryGuyR1(config-if)#ip add 100.100.100.1 255.255.255.0
FryGuyR1(config-if)#no shut
FryGuyR1(config-if)#^Z
FryGuyR1#sh int g0/0 | inc up
GigabitEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Full-duplex, 100Mb/s, media type is RJ45
FryGuyR1#

Ok, onto Sw1 (VLAN 100 for this example)

FryGuyBlog-SW1(config)#vlan 100
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-vlan)#name BlogVlan
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-vlan)#exit
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config)#spanning-tree vl 100 roo pri
FryGuyBlog- SW1(config)#int vlan 100
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#ip add 100.100.100.10 255.255.255.0
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#no shut
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#int f0/1
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#sw mo ac
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#sw ac vl 100
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#int f0/2
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#sw mo ac
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#sw ac vl 100
FryGuyBlog-SW1(config-if)#^Z
FryGuyBlog-SW1#

Now onto R2

FryGuyBlogR2(config)#int g0/0
FryGuyBlogR2(config-if)#ip add 100.100.100.2 255.255.255.0
FryGuyBlogR2(config-if)#no shut
FryGuyBlogR2(config-if)#^Z
FryGuyBlogR2#

Now, lets use R1 to ping SW1 and R2 to test connectivity

FryGuyR1#ping 100.100.100.2

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 100.100.100.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/1 ms
FryGuyR1#ping 100.100.100.10

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 100.100.100.10, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/4 ms
FryGuyR1#

Good there!
Now lets copy some IOS to R1 from a remote computer at 100.100.100.25

FryGuyR1#copy tftp flash:
Address or name of remote host []? 100.100.100.25
Source filename []? c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-25.SEE.bin
Destination filename [c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-25.SEE.bin]?
Accessing tftp://100.100.100.10/c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-25.SEE.bin…
Loading c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-25.SEE.bin from 100.100.100.10 (via GigabitEthernet0/0):
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[OK – 7131928 bytes]

7131928 bytes copied in 31.452 secs (226756 bytes/sec)
FryGuyR1#

Note: on some platforms the system check to see if the image being copied is a valid executable for that system. If it is not, it will present a warning asking if you want to abort.  Just enter N and the image will copy.

FryGuyR3#copy tftp flash:
Address or name of remote host []? 100.100.100.1
Source filename []? c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
Destination filename [c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin]?
Accessing tftp://100.100.100.1/c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin…
%Warning: File not a valid executable for this system
Abort Copy? [confirm]N
Loading c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-25.SEE.bin from 100.100.100.10 (via FastEthernet0/0):
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK – 7131928 bytes]

So now that we have that file on R1, lets look at the flash and see what files are there:

FryGuyR1#dir
Directory of flash:/

1  -rw-    38906040   Apr 3 2008 19:07:08 +00:00  c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
2  -rw-     7131928  Jan 25 2011 04:11:56 +00:00  c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-25.SEE.bin

64012288 bytes total (7311360 bytes free)
FryGuyR1#

Ok, we have two IOS images in FLASH.  One for this router and another for a 3550 switch.
Next, lets configure R1 as a TFTP server to server these files out.

FryGuyR1(config)#tftp-server flash:c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-25.SEE.bin
FryGuyR1(config)#tftp-server flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
FryGuyR1(config)# ^Z
FryGuyR1#

Note: If we had a USB drive, the you would use USBx (where X=usb slot) instead of flash

Now, lets test this out.  First, lets enable some TFTP debugs to make sure this is working
FryGuyR1#debug tftp events
TFTP Event debugging is on
FryGuyR1#

Now, lets initiate the transfer from R2

FryGuyBlogR2#copy tftp flash
Address or name of remote host []? 100.100.100.1
Source filename []? c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
Destination filename [c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin]?
Accessing tftp://100.100.100.1/c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin…
Loading c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin from 100.100.100.1 (via GigabitEthernet0/0):
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[OK – 38906040 bytes]

FryGuyBlogR2#dir
Directory of flash:/

1  -rw-    38906040  Jan 25 2011 04:09:32 +00:00  c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin

Great, file copied.  Now lets look at the debug output on R1 to see what is said.

FryGuyR1#debug tftp events
TFTP Event debugging is on
FryGuyR1#
*Jan 25 04:21:35.759: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:21:35.927: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 0, size 38906040 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:21:35.935: TFTP: Finished flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, time 00:00:00 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:21:35.939: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:21:36.107: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 0, size 38906040 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:21:36.107: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:21:36.275: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 1, size 38906040 for process 239
*Jan 25 04:21:36.283: TFTP: Finished flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, time 00:00:00 for process 239
*Jan 25 04:21:36.283: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:21:36.451: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 1, size 38906040 for process 239
*Jan 25 04:21:36.479: TFTP: Finished flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, time 00:00:00 for process 239
*Jan 25 04:21:37.475: TFTP: Finished flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, time 00:00:01 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:21:38.475: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:21:38.643: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 0, size 38906040 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:21:38.651: TFTP: Finished flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, time 00:00:00 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:21:38.819: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:21:38.987: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 0, size 38906040 for process 97!
FryGuyR1#

As you can see, R1 showed the TFTP connections coming from R2 requesting the file.  This is a way to make sure you TFTP server is working, but then again if the copy was not you would probably know that.

Yet what is good about he debug, if you are working with someone else and they are having problems, you will see what file name they are looking for in the debug output:

*Jan 25 04:28:49.387: TFTP: Looking for asdfasdf

Now, if you are wondering why there are so many of the same entries in the log, to be honest I do not know.  What I suspect is that the receiving device is downloading the headers to see if is a valid IOS image.  I did a debug tftp packet and you can see part of the output here that shows part of the file was downloaded and stopped. I DO NOT recommend running this debug on a production router!
FryGuyR1#debug tftp packets
TFTP Packet debugging is on
FryGuyR1#
*Jan 25 04:36:36.639: TFTP: Server request for port 57088, socket_id 0x659592E4 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:36:36.639: TFTP: read request from host 100.100.100.2(57088) via GigabitEthernet0/0
*Jan 25 04:36:36.639: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:36:36.807: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 0, size 38906040 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:36:36.807: TFTP: Sending block 1 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.807: TFTP: Received ACK for block 1, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.807: TFTP: Sending block 2 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.807: TFTP: Received ACK for block 2, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.807: TFTP: Sending block 3 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Received ACK for block 3, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Sending block 4 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Received ACK for block 4, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Sending block 5 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Received ACK for block 5, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Sending block 6 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Received ACK for block 6, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Sending block 7 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Received ACK for block 7, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Sending block 8 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Received ACK for block 8, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Sending block 9 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: error code 0 received – 21349

*Jan 25 04:36:36.811: TFTP: Finished flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, time 00:00:00 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:36:36.815: TFTP: Server request for port 52041, socket_id 0x659592E4 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:36:36.815: TFTP: read request from host 100.100.100.2(52041) via GigabitEthernet0/0
*Jan 25 04:36:36.815: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:36:36.983: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, fd 0, size 38906040 for process 97
*Jan 25 04:36:36.983: TFTP: Sending block 1 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.991: TFTP: Received ACK for block 1, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.991: TFTP: Sending block 2 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.991: TFTP: Received ACK for block 2, socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.991: TFTP: Sending block 3 (retry 0), socket_id 0x659592E4
*Jan 25 04:36:36.991: TFTP: Server request for port 53752, socket_id 0x66358420 for process 239
*Jan 25 04:36:36.991: TFTP: read request from host 100.100.100.2(53752) via GigabitEthernet0/0
*Jan 25 04:36:36.991: TFTP: Looking for c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin
*Jan 25 04:36:37.159: TFTP: Opened flash:c3845-advipservicesk9-mz.124-17b.bin, ACK for block 6, socket_id 0x66358420
*Jan 25 04:36:37.163: TFTP: Sending block 7 (retry 0), socket_id 0x66358420
*Jan 25 04:36:37.163: TFTP: Received ACK for block 7, socket_id 0x66358420 fd 1, size 38906040 for process 239
*Jan 25 04:36:37.159: TFTP: Sending blo
*Jan 25 04:36:37.163: TFTP: Sending block 8 (retry 0), socket_id 0x66358420
*Jan 25 04:36:37.163: TFTP: Received ACK for block 8, socket_id 0x66358420
*Jan 25 04:36:37.163: TFTP: Sending block 9 (retry 0), socket_id 0x66358420
*Jan 25 04:36:37.163: TFTP: error code 0 received – 21349

1995 Mustang Cobra Hardtop Convertible

In Uncategorized on January 16, 2011 at 22:22

Well, if you have not figured it out from the title, this is not a technical blog posting.  I have had a few people ask me about my car and give me confused, bewildered, and otherwise mystified faces.  Why you wonder, well – most people do not know that Ford ever made this car.  Yes, it is a Mustang; Yes, it is a Cobra; Yes, it is a convertible; and Yes – it has a removable hard-top as well! This was a car that I have wanted since I first saw them in 1995 at a local dealership, but unfortunately at that time I was not able to afford one.  As they say, all good things come to those who wait.

The 1995 Cobra was powered by a 240-hp 5.0L V-8 and is the same engine used in the 1994 Mustang Cobra.  The cars do 0-60 in about 6.7 seconds (slow compared to most cars today but back then that was quick!) and has a top speed of 140 mph.  Color options for the standard Mustang Cobra were Black (1433), White (1125), and Red (1447), for a total of 4005 units, of those 1003 convertibles were produced.  The 1995 model year was the only year a convertible hardtop was produced and only 499 of these Hardtop Convertibles were produced – all in Black .  There was a hardtop/ragtop that was installed as a prototype on a V6 and some GT Mustangs but were never “officially” produced.  Another new feature for 1995 was the addition of SVT badging, the Cobra’s from the previous years did not designate themselves as Special Vehicle Team cars.

What is the purpose of the Hardtop Convertible one may ask?  Well, the whole reason behind it (from my understanding) is so you can have a convertible in the summer via the soft-top, and then when Winter comes, put the hardtop on and you are good to go.  It was designed to be an all year car, not like the regular convertibles of the day that were summer only.  The hardtop has glass in the rear with a defogger, so it is a fully functioning top. Interior light, headliner, etc!

You can see the V6 Hardtop Convertible as well as some of the other prototype cars in the VHS cassette that accompanied the purchase of the car.  This tape was the instructions for how to remove and install the hard-top.   When I purchased my car the VHS tape came with it – and it was in very good shape.  I have since paid for the VHS tape to be professionally transferred to DVD format so that I can review it any time I would like.  I have since taken the DVD video and converted it to WMV format. Below is the video:

This Cobra is number 934 of 1003 when it comes to the number of Cobra Convertibles ans #435/499 of the Hardtop Convertibles.  This card listed for $30,685 in 1995 – now, that might not seem like too much today, but remember that the average price of a NEW car was $15,000 and the average income in the USA was $35,000/yr !  This Cobra was definitely in the high-end of pricing for cars that year!  The hard-top option added $1825 to the price of the base Cobra Convertible – and rumor has it that each roof was hand-fitted to each car.  The factory have a very difficult time with these tops as they did not fit perfectly right off the line.

I have had this car a little over a year now (purchased in the fall of 2009) and have really enjoyed it.  I think that I will keep it for a few more years until it is time for another toy.  One thing I have vowed to do is keep this car stock and original.  That has been a very difficult task as after-market power adders are so easy to find for this car.  But in the end, I think that it is worth more to the next collector if it is all there.

Below are some pics of the car and various accessories:

Front View - 95 Cobra had the Running Pony emblem

Driver's side

With the hardtop on

Soft top on

Roof off

Roof

Interior

The ole 5.0

SVT Certificate

Brochure and VHS

Stand for the Hardtop

Winter rest...

Just some of the Mustang posters in the garage

Just some of the Mustang posters in the garage cont

Just about all the SN97 rear emblems

Original Sticker

Gestalt IT’s first datacenter-focused Field Day event

In Uncategorized on January 14, 2011 at 16:09

Well I got the official notice today that I will be attending a Gestalt IT Tech Field Day event on February 10th and 11th in 2011 in San Jose, CA.  I feel honored as well as humbled to be invited to this event.  It is a great chance to meet new people, learn from their experiences, listen to their war stories, as well as the chance to see what the vendors have to say.

What is Tech Field Day, you ask?  Well – to explain it best I am going to quote it from Gestalt’s website:

This unique event brings together innovative IT product vendors and independent thought leaders who have immense influence on the ways that products and companies are perceived and understood by the general public. The world of media has changed, with social media and blogging gaining special importance. Our Field Day is an opportunity for tech companies and independent writers to get to know each other. Ultimately, we hope to provide a forum for engagement, education, hands-on experience, and feedback. This event is run as a community service rather than a profit-motivated media business. In this way, costs are kept to a reasonable minimum, involvement is encouraged, and fun is part of everything we do.

Gestalt IT’s Tech Field Day #5 is their first data center focused event this year and will be held in Silicon Valley.  ( Ahh, a warmer climate for a few days – especially when you compare it to the North East right now.  ).  I am very excited to see the line-up for this even, companies like Symantec, DataRobotics (cool – Drobo!), NetEx, and Inflblox are just some of the companies I will get to listen to and learn from as well as have the opportunity to ask questions.

You can learn more about the event at the following link:  Gestalt IT Tech Field Day #5 or for more general information: Gestalt IT Tech Field Day

 

New Cisco Compact Switches!

In Uncategorized on January 11, 2011 at 19:48

Well, just the other day Cisco announced some new Compact switches that should replace the Cisco 2940(yeah, I know that they were EOL and replaced with 2960-8)  and 3560-8 series switches.  The product information can be found here – Link.  The new switches are the Cisco 3560-C and 2960-C series.

These really have my attention from an Enterprise perspective.  I cannot tell you how many conference rooms we have that have either the 2940 or the 3560-8 switches mounted under the table.  Those switches work great, except for the fact that we need to also run a power-cord to them.  I cannot tell you how many times our NOC has contacted us with regards to a switch being reset due to power-on and it turning out someone kicked the power cord.  We run the Cisco 3560-8 at places where we need PoE ports  for phones and such, and the 2940/2960 series are used where no PoE is required.

So what is so intriguing to me about the new 2960-C switches? Well, the biggest thing that I noticed is that you can now get switches that will be powered via PoE and  PoE+ ports instead of an external power cord. This is feature is called PD PSE -Powered Devices (PD) and Power Sourcing Equipment (PSE) and is in available it WS-C2960CPD series of switches.  The way that it works is that you connect the dedicated copper uplinks on the 2960CPD switch to a PoE or PoE+ capable switch, the switch then senses the device requesting the power and provides the power necessary to the device.  This is the 802.3af (PoE) and 802.3at (PoE+) standards and works just like an IP phone does connected to a switch. One thing to note on the PS/PSE 2960C is that you can also get an external power supply to power the device.  This is a nice feature if you do not have PoE capable devices today but plan to deploy them at a later date. Below is an image taken from Cisco’s website that shows the PD/PSE switches on the left and the non PD/PSE switches below

PD/PSE Capable 2960-C Switches

3560-C and 2960-C Switches non PD/PSE

What I can gather from the information that is currently available, but still cannot confirm, is that if you are using PoE+, the switch supports PoE pass-through so that you can also power a downstream IP Phone, Camera, etc via the compact switch.  This is a really good feature for conference rooms, kiosks, as well as areas where you do not want to run power cables.  This can help to insure that all your critical network devices are connected to protected (UPS/Generator) power sources in the event of a utility outage.  Most conference rooms that I have see are not considered critical rooms and are not usually on UPS power.  Most switch rooms and closets, on the other-hand, are almost always on some type of protected power.

Both switches feature the usual stuff expected in a network switch – VLAN, VTP, LACP, QoS, MDIX, UDLD, VTP, RSPAN, and such.  They also have some nice security features as well – Port Security, DHCP snooping, IP Source guard, PVLAN, port-based ACLs, Spanning-tree Root Guard and such.  The PVLAN feature for a conference room is an interesting concept.  Never truly thought about deploying it in a conference room switch, but might have to consider that in the future.  We do have conference rooms where Visitors are allowed to connect to an outside network, and perhaps configuring a switch with PVLANs there would be a nice way to prevent unauthorized snooping, virus passing, and just evil things that I would never do.

So, what are some of the differences between the 2960-C and 3560-C that are worth noting (or at least I noticed more then the others)?  Well, with the Cisco 3560-C you can get a L3 capable switch – just like it’s big brothers.  Having some of these features available is interesting, not sure if it is overly practical to be honest – but is a good feature to have if you are putting the switch in a lab network.    The Cisco 3560-C is also only powered via an external power supply and does not currently support PD/PSE.    One thing I did notice is that the GLC-T is NOT supported in these switches, you will probably need to buy the SFP-GE-T one.  The price difference is that the SFP-GE-T is about $50 more list (about 450 list for the SFP-GE-T and the GLC-T lists at about 400).

Another note on the L3 for the Cisco 3560-C, it is controlled by a license file on the switch itself.  There is no hardware difference between L2 and the L3 models, only a silly license file.  If you buy the 3560-C , you can transparently upgrade the software feature set through Cisco IOS® Software activation.   This is a nice way to do the upgrade – no IOS to upload just a simple activation routine.  I think they went this way because of the old 3500 switches that you buy with SMI code but can install EMI code and make it a full L3 switch.  This is good business sense, yet I think that it may make things a bit over-complicated at time.

Another nice feature on these is the support of a USB A type port.  This can make life much easier when it comes to either backing up configs, replacing a bad switch, or just IOS upgrades.  I have used the USB drives on ASR, Nexus 7000, 2800/3800, etc to upgrade code, backup configs before replacements, or even to quickly recover a device.    I have also been known to use the USB drive to load an image for another device at the site and configure the router as a TFTP server to serve the file out. (hmm, idea for future blog post 🙂 )

One thing to note on the support and warranty on these is that they come with a limited lifetime warranty, 8x5xNBD replacement and 90 days of TAC out of the box.  By limited, means non-transferrable and only application to the original purchaser.

You can always find more information at Cisco’s website on these devices – here

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